Aussies once were laconic, laid back lot…

 

Forty, fifty, sixty years ago, BF; (Before Fraser), “G’day, ow yer goin’?” “Good ‘n, you?” was  a greeting, and response that could be heard all around Australia, when blokes, or sheilas, met. You hear it rarely nowadays; more’s the pity. The old ways in  Australia are fast disappearing.

Must admit, that for the past 20 years or more, whenever I’ve been asked how I’m going, I always answer “not bad, for a young bloke”, young blokes look at me as if I’m odd, old blokes scratch their noggin.

What started him on this ramble; you might be wondering, if you’ve got this far, well, I’ve been having trouble sleeping of late, and from sheer frustration one night, late, I turned on the idiot box, and tuned in to some American program, where a panel of 1 gal and 2 guys (note the American expressions) were babbling on, and getting somewhat excited, about some sporting event.

I wasn’t taking much notice of what they were ‘discussing’, I  found myself watching, fascinated by something I’d never noticed before. Americans actually open and use their mouths when, and as, they speak.

I’ve kind of noticed that the occupant of the Oval Office, has a mouth, that reminds me of a petulant parrot, when it starts prattling on, but I’d never noticed how every Americans  mouth/ lips are going flat stick, when they speak. Well every American on TV sports shows. 

It’s completely at odds, with the dinkum Australian way of speaking, where the lips barely move, which has been labelled laconic, for as long as I can remember. Some have had the temerity to call it lazy.

The simple, you might believe simplistic,  explanation goes back to the time of the early settlers from Great Britain, who found the heat during the long, dry summers harsh, and that by speaking whilst barely moving the lips, was more comfortable and easier than speaking normally, whilst taking in great gulps of very hot air, (which is now spurted out by our pollies).

It also has the added attraction, of making it harder to swallow flies. Yes I’ve seen ‘blowies’ as big as a 20 cent piece, so big and heavy that they can barely fly. I kid you not!

Must admit, too, that I’ve had my fill of flies, literally, when I went bush a long time back, but I’m not getting into that! Australia does have a bad, you might say very bad, fly problem.

I suppose in another 40 or 50 years, there wont be any blokes or sheilas left, to say g’day, just guys and gals saying ‘hi’ ; or perhaps अच्छा दिन, or maybe 美好的一天  or even ngày tốt; just glad that I wont be around. 

Congratulations if you got this far. 😛

1F428

I’m feeling rather sprightly at the moment; so I might just throw some more drivel at the unwary, and lets be honest; have you ever read as much as this in your life before?

37 thoughts on “Aussies once were laconic, laid back lot…

  1. To His Lordship. I have noticed an amazing lack of contact by you on my blog for the last couple of months and have been concerned for your wellbeing.
    But now something completely puzzling.
    Your post, has just arrived on my blog in the comments column. The whole lot, right from, “G’day, ow yer goin’? down to bear emoji. I wonder if there has been some weird connection between my blog and yours. It is especially puzzling because of the absence of contact for such a long time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Well I haven’t been on much of late. this post I started about 2 months ago, some/most days I don’t even bother opening up, my email box sometimes just gets dumped, sometimes I answer some mail,a week or so late. I’ve lost a fair bit of interest, I kid myself I’ll get back into posting again but when it gets down to the nitty gritty I=m slack

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes. I have been rather worried that I might have offended you in some way. Be that as it may, I am still concerned that your post has turned up on my blog as a comment. I have tried to delete it but it won’t go away.
        I do hope you feel up to continuing more posts. When they are cleansed of drivel they do add a certain joy to an otherwise dull world.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. If I visit Australia to visit cousins and the locals don’t say, ‘Fair dinkum; good on yer, mate!’ how will I know I’m there? ‘Hi,’ or ‘squiggle’ or ‘worse squiggle’ just doesn’t cut it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Most dinkum Aussies don’t use the fair that often, just dinkum, you’ll know you’re here if you can see The Bridge

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I don’t dinkum I can . . .
        So they have become unfair?

        Like

        1. I not sure, I hope not, I’m confused!
          You have the knack of doing that to me 😇

          Like

        2. Me confuse you? Surely not. How could anytwo-or-three even sink such a sing?

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Great, entertaining, post from a spritely young bloke, innit?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I originally used spritely and I was told that it was incorrect, sp I switched ton sprightly and it was accepted, who am I to argue? Even WordPress is underlining the spritely; I do prefer your way 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Much more faery 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  4. mmm-mm-dhmns-mshrssmm-mrghmm!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Taken to the bottle at last have you?

      Like

  5. Ira Kowalski 18/09/2018 — 19:39

    Blow flies the size of 20 cent coin!
    We should have been so lucky. Have seen ones the size to rival Jumbo Jets. And forget worrying that they may fly into your mouth. If one of them comes anywhere near you, and you can still stand and tell the tale, I’d say it was you very lucky day.
    Love your ramblings. And so good to hear from you.
    Ira

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes I’ve seen them Ira, but they don’t fly around in squadrons, like the 2 bob ones do, I can recall hen I used to work at Essendon airport in Melbourne, flat and HOT in summer, the northerlies would bring these 2 bob blowies and we’d use rules/rulers like baseball bats and swing at them; they did make quite a mess once splattered

      Liked by 1 person

  6. …And have you heard why people from the (once) industrial cities of England speak with their mouths wide open, their eyes bulging, and exaggerated facial expressions? Apparently, when their forefathers (and foremothers) worked in factories, they had to use these facial contortions to be understood over the noise? I always thought this interesting…and now I’m going to be in trouble with descendants of people from places like Manchester, England!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. and here I was, thinking they had to pull those faces, to be able to speak in that incoherent accent, that’s impossible for any self respecting Cockney to understand 😈 (Now I’ve joined you)
      Seriously though, it does make sense what you say, the noise must have been horrendous.
      I once worked in a very noisy factory/workshop/blacksmithy for all of five days before getting fired. and the noise drove me up the wall.
      The men had to shout to make themselves heard and their faces were somewhat distorted, there must have been a dozen, or more, steam hammers, besides a couple of drop hammers, going full pelt. Bedlam; I wasn’t cut out for that life.

      Like

  7. Americans like to show off their cosmetically white teeth!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Which always look downright unnatural to me, but I didn’t see much in the way of teeth, just lips and mouths moving, I must admit, I tried doing and speaking like that, and couldn’t!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Well I’ve certainly learned a thing or two today. The next time there’s an Aussie on tv, I’ll be watching very closely — although likely, if they’re acting in American films, they’ve been trained to speak more like Americans.

    Delighted to hear you’re feeling all bright-eyed and bushy-tailed today. I do worry about you, you know.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Those blokes, we used to call derisively, way back in the 50’s, “Kings Cross Yanks!” perhaps I need to do a follow up as to why.
      Thank you for the kind words Susan, kind of makes me feel important; I suppose I really should have said humble, but I don’t know how to be humble 😇 😈 😇

      Like

  9. HA! Well, all I know is I like to be friendly and talk to anyone and everyone…and I like when they are friendly back to me! 🙂 And I love when people call me a name or nickname of endearment…like “young lady”. 😀

    I’m glad you are feeling sprightly, Lord 🐻 iOfBow!!! 😀 :mrgreen: 😛
    When you don’t post, I wonder how you are doing and if you are okay. And Cooper wonders about Coco, too.

    HUGS!!! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m a bit like that, gets on the War Offices nerves at times, me chatting to all and anyone, ‘specially when we’re down the park with our Coco 🐶 🐾 🐩 , Dog people are great chatters 😅 😊.
      Well thank you Carolyn for those nice remarks, must admit it does feel good and makes a nice change. 😊 😅 My poor Coco is getting older by the day, he’s got more grey hairs on his face than I’ve got on my head, and he can’t run and play so much as he liked to do, 🐶 🐶 gets tired very quickly,taking him to the vets tomorrow for a check up. He hasn’t lost his appetite though still loves to chomp on everything on my plate as well as what’s in his bowl, just gave me a nudge and told me to say g’day to Coop and ask “‘ow yer goin’ Coop’ 🐾 🐩

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Just because people south of Brisbane speak ‘properly’ nowadays come to way north of Brissy and you’ll meet shielas and blokes still and lots of me mates are true dinkum Aussies and always ask ya how ya are, mate – even to the shielas.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Nice to know there’s still a few pockets of civilization left, but I’ll lay you pounds to peanuts; (you from Toowoomba by any chance Outback?) that’it’s staring to dwindle in the big smoke, and Brisbane’s getting to be a pretty big, big smoke these day’s. I still miss that outback of the west Aussie bush.
      Thanks for dropping by Outlander always nice to meet new bloggrers

      Like

      1. Nope – way further north than Toowoomba. Out where it don’t rain and the farmers are doin’ it tough , really tough. The people down south have no idea how the blokes up here are shooting cows and sheep ‘cos it ain’t raining.

        Like

        1. I said Toowoomba thinking about old Joe BP & Flo and peanuts. Been a while since I was up your way more than 40 years. It wasn’t so bad back then, I can imagine whats going on having been a bushie for some time over in the west,and I feel for you poor blokes and get p…..d off at these damned tv clowns getting all smart and sorrowful while the cameras are rolling, the bs don’t have a clue.
          I hear moaning and groaning around where I am cos the garden dying off for want of rain.

          Liked by 1 person

  11. Well, good to see you back on blogging, whatever the motivation, and I hope you avagoodweegend

    Like

    1. Lets just hope I can stay here, well I’ll hope; don’t know about you lot 😈

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Isn’t it funny that human geography is a interesting as land geography….probably more important to civility and getting along, too? (Especially now with so many so quick to take offense – or looking to take offense and do so out of ignorance of customs and styles.)
    It’s hard right now to go outside without sniffing up a mosquito – much less opening g mouths to talk – and suddenly the tiny gnat/no-see-ems are showing up. Doing much encouragement to our yard’s spiders and lizard (who are getting fat and we sorry they will nap too much.)
    (I’m feeling sluggish about posting/.reading blogs, too…maybe cooler weather – or return to commonsense by the general public might hep…may be waiting a while here….)

    Like

    1. Yes, did you read that comment by Diane? aka Still the lucky few; throws a few more logs on the fire.
      I’m not sure what I detest most, the mozzies or the flies; when I’m trying to get some sleep it’s the mozzies for sure, and they love to get stuck onto me, but flies make me shudder.
      As for coomonsense I doubt the younger generations can even spell the word, let alone have any idea what it means. As for the pollies they wouldn’t have a clue and the occupant of the Oval Office………………………

      Liked by 1 person

      1. (Conversations here are always worth a read, too. Great widespread commenters with big range of thoughts.)
        Many now don’t have a clue about what is proper in any office – square, open, or curved
        (and some want to lower the voting age…shudder…although preschoolers do tend to see things well withouts all the side show clutter…)

        Like

        1. I think that all the comments, and commentators are the best thing about this webpage/site/blog/post/ that’s the only reason i check in now and then
          😀

          Liked by 1 person

  13. The loss of language, similar to some of the Yorkshire expressions that we apparently use here in the county such as Ee By Gum, but in reality no one ever does. Sometimes I listen to Cockneys on TV and I can’t help wondering if they still use some of the expressions and slang language or is it said simply for TV effect.

    Like

    1. In late 1944 my brother and I were a couple of ‘vacuees for a few months to Burnley in Lancashire;( whilst my mother was about to delivery our sister) now my brother just couldn’t help himself, he was a natural at picking up the accent, and when we got back to London he sounded like a Scouse and he ee by guumed, me I never lost my Cockney accent and if you heard me on the phone 67 years after leaving London you’d still pick my Cockney accent. I envied him, probably when he finished up in London he had a Californian accent as he’d lived there for a while, went back to England and died a couple of years later. Only 75.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Odd how some of us lose the accent and yet others retain it. I had a broad Yorkshire accent as a child, but somehow over the years those rough edges were smoothed away without even leaving Yorkshire. Today there’s hardly a trace of it, my husband never lost his thick accent and my children never developed one.

        Sorry about the loss of your brother, 75 is no age.

        Like

  14. Interesting post. It brings back memories of living in the Deep South. Rule #1 was move your mouth and tongue as little as possible when speaking, and drag it all out real slow. It’s too hot and humid to expect much of anything else. We don’t want to melt.

    Here in Philly, as you may know, it’s loud and in your face! Especially in the city. 🙂

    Like

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Paol Soren

A bit of this and that

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Nan's Farm-Inside Out

A Journal Of Everyday Life With Occasional Dips Into The Unexpected

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