Dr. Brett Adams.

In October 2011 I had a stroke. Doctor Adams performed two ‘Endartarectomy’ operations; removed the cholesterol from my carotid arteries.

Over the next 2  years, I saw him at regular intervals ; and in October 2013 he gave me the all clear and told me I could expect to live ’til 150, and there was no need for me to see him again. 

I was disappointed in a way, we had built a very close relationship, through our reading habits, he was an avid reader, and we compared notes, recommended books, and probably spent more time on this than the medical, although he was always extremely methodical, and thorough. I missed my consultations.

 Now I can’t!

My wife was up on the Northern Beaches today, and brought home the local paper, when she arrived home , she handed me the paper opened at the ‘Funeral Notices’.

On Friday, the 20th January 2017 at 11.30 am  the funeral service for Doc Adams will take place at the Northern Suburbs Crematorium.

Doctor Adams had died last Wednesday 11th. January at the very young age of just 64 years; no cause was given, just that he “passed away peacefully”.

Along with Doctors Fogarty & Sandroussi, he made up my, my Father Son & Holy Ghost. All mighty surgeons who extended my time. 

His death is a great loss, to the people of the Northern Beaches and to the medical students at Macquarie University, where he was a lecturer.

dr-adams

26 thoughts on “Dr. Brett Adams.

    1. I don’t dwell on death too long. It’s a bit like trying to imagine being a unicorn . . . you think that what you know enough about unicorns that you can imagine being one, but you don’t and you can’t.

      Of course, unicorns exist only in the bibles and other fables whereas death appears quite real and always lurking about waiting for you to take a misstep or two. Sometimes it gets impatient of waiting. Regardless, I think contemplating it too long or too often is a monumental waste of time.

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    1. Thank you GP, it came as a shock, when I was given the news, he was such a fine man; so vibrant. We shared a passion for British Naval history, and spent much time discussing this as well as fiction during my visits to him. I missed them, when he told me that I had recovered fully, and there was no need for me to return.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Sorry for you loss of your friend. I am thankful that your still around to mourn his loss.
    Still love ya
    Lisa

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    1. Thank you PT, I was very upset when my wife gave me the news, he was an amazing, no nonsense man, devoted to saving lives, but seemingly unable to save his own.

      I’d go to the funeral on Friday, but as things happen, it’s taking place at the very same time, as I have, what quite possibly is, my last visit to the third of my personal holy trinity, Doctor Sandroussi.

      Lets hope I do NOT put the mockers on him!

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  2. The relationship one develops with a doctor can become very real over time. I was devastated when my doctor, after twenty years had a breakdown and left the practise within a matter of one day. He recovered but never went back to work.

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    1. I had an instant rapport with Doctor Adams; we had much in common, except that he was the brilliant surgeon and I was his humble patient. I knew him, not long, but I felt I’d known him forever. I’d have been happy to keep going along and having my checkups, (Medibank covered very little of his fee) but he was an exceedingly busy surgeon and who am I to waste his time. Which it seems he had so little left.

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  3. Far too young. We still greatly miss our family doctor, friend, and fellow yachtsman to whom my wife, myself, and both children probably owe our lives when he dealt with some nasty threats to our continued existence.

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    1. I can readily understand that; some doctors have the knack/ ability, call it what you will, to inspire respect, and confidence without our being aware of it.
      Doc. Adams was such a man.

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  4. What a shame, the world has obviously lost a wonderful person. I am happy you got to make his acquaintance, and friendship, even if for a short time.

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    1. Yes indeed, Gwen, whenever I pick up a Jane Austen book now I think of him. He’d been forced as a boy at school to read her work and had a distinct dislike of it; I persuaded him that it was well worth reading, and he became a great lover and bought the complete set of her works in a bound edition.
      His knowledge of the RN was extraordinary and was cause of many good chats. My appointments always took up his time, but he didn’t seem to care. I think he was glad to have a kindred spirit when it came to naval history

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    1. Thank you; how true, I sometimes wonder why I’m still left here when people like Doctor Adams, are taken so very young. I feel very sad. Today is the funeral and I cannot get there as it clashes with my Doc. Sandroussi and I could not change that.

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  5. What a tough way to begin this year. I hear your pain in the fine tribute and in each of your comments above. What a privilege it was for you to meet Doctor Adams at this time in your life. Which, of course, made losing him so suddenly that much more painful. I think each of us carries bits and pieces of important people in our lives after they’ve gone. You’re a better man for knowing Doctor Adams, and I’m sure he would say the same about you. Sadness is a good thing. Makes us more human. 💐

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